Session Title

Resolution or Mandate? The Politics of Self-Archiving, Institutional Repository-Based Open Access Initiatives

Location

KIPJ G

Session Type

Event

Start Date

9-4-2014 1:45 PM

End Date

9-4-2014 2:30 PM

Abstract

There are approximately 250 institutional open access policies worldwide as of early 2014 requiring or strongly encouraging faculty to self-archive journal manuscripts and other publications in institutional repositories. Some institutional policies are more rigid than others. Some are mandates while others take the form of resolutions, encouragement, or flexible policies. This presentation will be a case study and will look at the philosophical and practical advantages and disadvantages of a “mandate” versus a “resolution” within the context of one university’s experience. Other facets of the presentation will include political considerations, semantic issues, faculty concerns, disciplinary differences, and the reality of backchannel maneuvers when advocating for a self-archiving, institutional repository-based open access policy on campus. Future plans for other related initiatives will also be explored.

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Apr 9th, 1:45 PM Apr 9th, 2:30 PM

Resolution or Mandate? The Politics of Self-Archiving, Institutional Repository-Based Open Access Initiatives

KIPJ G

There are approximately 250 institutional open access policies worldwide as of early 2014 requiring or strongly encouraging faculty to self-archive journal manuscripts and other publications in institutional repositories. Some institutional policies are more rigid than others. Some are mandates while others take the form of resolutions, encouragement, or flexible policies. This presentation will be a case study and will look at the philosophical and practical advantages and disadvantages of a “mandate” versus a “resolution” within the context of one university’s experience. Other facets of the presentation will include political considerations, semantic issues, faculty concerns, disciplinary differences, and the reality of backchannel maneuvers when advocating for a self-archiving, institutional repository-based open access policy on campus. Future plans for other related initiatives will also be explored.