Title

The Undergraduate as Public Scholar: Digital Scholarship and Information Literacy

Location

KIPJ Room D

Session Type

Panel Session

Start Date

2-5-2017 10:15 AM

End Date

2-5-2017 11:45 AM

Keywords

information literacy, digital citizenship, digital literacy, ACRL IL Framework, scholarly communication, undergraduate research, cross-library collaboration

Abstract

Libraries are at the nexus of an expanded definition of scholarship that changes how we teach information literacy to undergraduates who are not only information seekers, but also creators of new knowledge. Their academic works have been shared farther and are accessed more often than traditionally published forms of scholarship. While the definition of a “scholarly work” is still understood by most in the academy as a peer-reviewed journal article or monograph published by a prestigious academic publisher, this narrow construct is being challenged by undergraduate scholarship that is accessed, cited, and engaged in a global scholarly conversation. This crucial understanding that their work will be read by an exponentially larger and more diverse audience is missing from the undergraduate curriculum. Librarians in scholarly communication and instruction are aware of this evolution of scholarship and are beginning to work in concert to guide learners toward a robust understanding of digital citizenship. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy explicitly ties the work of information literacy and scholarly communications librarians together to address questions of information privilege, creation and access, ethics, and attribution. The presenters share their approaches to incorporating aspects of the scholarly communication agenda into library instruction, ranging from lower-division community college courses to a course for students completing a capstone in their major and sharing it globally through their institutional repository. Wherever students are creating and sharing information, a deep engagement with the affordances and challenges of the digital ecosystem is crucial for the undergraduate experience and the nascent public scholar.

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May 2nd, 10:15 AM May 2nd, 11:45 AM

The Undergraduate as Public Scholar: Digital Scholarship and Information Literacy

KIPJ Room D

Libraries are at the nexus of an expanded definition of scholarship that changes how we teach information literacy to undergraduates who are not only information seekers, but also creators of new knowledge. Their academic works have been shared farther and are accessed more often than traditionally published forms of scholarship. While the definition of a “scholarly work” is still understood by most in the academy as a peer-reviewed journal article or monograph published by a prestigious academic publisher, this narrow construct is being challenged by undergraduate scholarship that is accessed, cited, and engaged in a global scholarly conversation. This crucial understanding that their work will be read by an exponentially larger and more diverse audience is missing from the undergraduate curriculum. Librarians in scholarly communication and instruction are aware of this evolution of scholarship and are beginning to work in concert to guide learners toward a robust understanding of digital citizenship. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy explicitly ties the work of information literacy and scholarly communications librarians together to address questions of information privilege, creation and access, ethics, and attribution. The presenters share their approaches to incorporating aspects of the scholarly communication agenda into library instruction, ranging from lower-division community college courses to a course for students completing a capstone in their major and sharing it globally through their institutional repository. Wherever students are creating and sharing information, a deep engagement with the affordances and challenges of the digital ecosystem is crucial for the undergraduate experience and the nascent public scholar.