Title

Scholarly Communication in the Context of Digital Literacy: Navigation and Decision Making in a Complex Landscape

Location

Room D

Session Type

90-minute panel session

Start Date

24-4-2018 10:15 AM

End Date

24-4-2018 11:45 AM

Abstract

As digital technologies have come to dominate the conduct and dissemination of scholarship, seasoned and budding scholars alike may have little knowledge of what happens with the data that are gathered from their scholarly products, online profiles, and community platforms. Growing commercialization, mergers, buyouts, and venture capital investment lend credence to the idea of research results as “big data” to be mined and scholarly communication as “big business”. The scope of the issues that now govern the funding and sharing of knowledge is formidable and international. How does one even begin to understand what is needed to navigate and make decisions in such a complex environment? Not just a concern of faculty, these issues can have profound influence on student learning, academic services, and society at large. Scholarly communication is often viewed as a mechanistic and closed system; we should reframe it in a larger context and apply concepts of digital literacy and social justice.

Comments

Joyce L. Ogburn currently serves as Digital Strategies and Partnerships Librarian at Appalachian State University. Formerly she was the Dean of Libraries and Carol G. Belk Distinguished Professor of Library and Information Studies. She was the Dean of the J. Willard Marriott and University Librarian at the University of Utah and also served as special assistant to the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Her career path includes positions the University of Washington, Old Dominion University, Yale University, and Penn State University. She holds degrees in anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Indiana University, and a Master of Science in library science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Joyce’s professional contributions include numerous boards and committees for such organizations as the Association of Research Libraries, the Center for Research Libraries, the Greater Western Library Alliance, and the Scholarly Publishing and Resources Coalition (SPARC). In 2011-12, Joyce served as President of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL). In 2012, Utah Business Magazine named her as one of 30 Women to Watch. She was honored by the UNC-CH School of Information and Library Science as distinguished alumna in 2013 and joined their Board of Visitors in 2014.

Her passion lies in the interweaving paths of scholarship and interdisciplinary knowledge that libraries inspire, promote, and preserve in many forms. Her most recent publication is “Scholarly Communication and Digital Literacy.” Digital Literacy in Higher Education, Part II: A NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief, ed. by B. Alexander, S. Adams Becker, M. Cummins., and C. Hall Geisinger. Austin TX: The New Media Consortium, 2017, pp. 31-32.

Allegra Swift joined UC San Diego as the first Scholarly Communications Librarian in June of 2017. Allegra is developing strategies, resources, and networks to support the gamut of scholarly communications needs on campus. Prior to this position, she was the Scholarly Communications Coordinator for the Claremont Colleges where she was responsible for the institutional repository, publishing and author support, and developing resources and services.

Emma Molls is the Publishing Services Librarian at the University of Minnesota Libraries in Minneapolis, MN. In this role, Emma manages the development of open access journals, monographs, and textbooks under the University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing imprint. She recently managed the migration of journals from bepress to OJS. Emma is the co-founder and organizer of the monthly OpenCon Librarian Community Call. She is also a presenter for ACRL's Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy Roadshow.

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Apr 24th, 10:15 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Scholarly Communication in the Context of Digital Literacy: Navigation and Decision Making in a Complex Landscape

Room D

As digital technologies have come to dominate the conduct and dissemination of scholarship, seasoned and budding scholars alike may have little knowledge of what happens with the data that are gathered from their scholarly products, online profiles, and community platforms. Growing commercialization, mergers, buyouts, and venture capital investment lend credence to the idea of research results as “big data” to be mined and scholarly communication as “big business”. The scope of the issues that now govern the funding and sharing of knowledge is formidable and international. How does one even begin to understand what is needed to navigate and make decisions in such a complex environment? Not just a concern of faculty, these issues can have profound influence on student learning, academic services, and society at large. Scholarly communication is often viewed as a mechanistic and closed system; we should reframe it in a larger context and apply concepts of digital literacy and social justice.