Date of Award

2001-05-01

Degree Name

PhD Nursing

Dissertation Committee

Jane Georges, PhD, RN; Susan Instone, DNSc, RN; Daniel Rivetti, DBA

Keywords

nursing, psychology, role conflict, social role theory, spousal support, stay-at-home mothers, women

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of guilt, degree of spousal support, role conflict, and decreased psychological well-being experienced by educated stay at home mothers with young children. Social role theory is utilized as a basis for the development of a theoretical model. Relevant research literature does not identify a link between guilt, degree of spousal support, role conflict, and decreased psychological well-being in stay at home educated mothers. The significance of this study was to bring recognition to the phenomenon among educated stay at home mothers that little or no attention has been acknowledged. The research design is a descriptive correlational study designed to identify the relationships that exists between educated stay at home educated mothers experiencing guilt, degree of spousal support, role conflict, and decreased psychological well-being. Seventy-two married, educated, full-time stay at home educated mothers with young children responded to the questionnaires. The participants were recruited from the Solana Beach Community Preschool, the San Diego Junior League and the Children's Hospital Auxiliary Volunteer organization. Descriptive and correlational statistics were used to analyze the data. A canonical correlation analysis was employed to study the relationships between the variables. The projected findings are that there does exist a relationship between guilt, spousal support, and role conflict affecting the psychological well-being of stay at home educated mothers. The relevance and implications for nursing practice and research are discussed.

Document Type

Dissertation: Open Access

Department

Nursing

Included in

Nursing Commons

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