Date of Award

2006-05-01

Degree Name

PhD Nursing

Dissertation Committee

Kathy James, DNSc, Chairperson; Diane Hatton, PhD; Mary Nies, PhD

Keywords

exercise, health promotion behaviors, Hispanic Americans, nursing, physical activity, postmenopausal, self-efficacy, women

Abstract

The purpose of this correlational research is to understand the relationships among the variables of exercise self-efficacy, stages of exercise change, health promotion behaviors, body mass index (BMI), health problems, and the level of physical activity in postmenopausal Hispanic women. The significance of this study is to contribute research that enhances the understanding of the relationship of psychosocial and health promotion correlates and physical activity in postmenopausal Hispanic women. On a national level, this is important because Hispanic women make up one of the fastest growing minority populations and they experience the second highest level of obesity. This research is essential for knowledge on which to base interventions for health promotion and the prevention of debilitating health challenges caused by obesity. The theoretical significance of this research is the application of the Transtheoretical Model on stages of exercise change and testing the complementing constructs of Pender's Health Promotion model, including self-efficacy and health promoting behaviors. A descriptive correlational design was used to examine the relationship among the variables. A sample of 121 participants was surveyed from clinical and community settings located in Southern California. A multivariate analysis was computed to explore the relative contribution of modifiable psychosocial correlates of exercise self-efficacy, stages of exercise change, health promotion behaviors, health problems and BMI with the level of physical activity. The study population had a mean age of 57 years, was primarily born in Mexico (47.3%), obese (36.9%), and reported between one and six health problems. The findings from this research demonstrated statistically significant correlations between exercise self-efficacy, stages of exercise change, health promotion behaviors, and level of physical activity. Further, there was a significant inverse correlation of the study variables with health problems and BMI. The findings from this research will develop knowledge useful for the future strategic development of physical activity interventions and programs to facilitate healthy lifestyles with the inclusion of physical activity that are specific to postmenopausal Hispanic women.

Document Type

Dissertation: Open Access

Department

Nursing

Included in

Nursing Commons

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