Presenter Information

Pim Slot, SURFmarketFollow

Location

KIPJ Room EF

Session Type

10-minute lightning talk

Start Date

28-4-2020 10:30 AM

End Date

28-4-2020 10:40 AM

Keywords

OERs, Textbooks, Affordable Learning, eTextbooks

Abstract

SURF, the collaborative organisation for IT in education and research in the Netherlands, is trying to set up a national service for digital textbooks in higher education. From 2017 onwards, several pilots have been executed in order to find out how such a service should function. Which model would work? An "All You Can Read" Spotify-like model? A “Read What You Need” Model? And what would the digital infrastructure look like for such a service? A national platform? Or is standardization sufficient, and can every university choose its own platform? Can universities continue to get away with shifting responsibility for the purchase of learning resources to the student?

The pilots made it clear that a number of conditions must be met for the desired service to succeed:

  • The most important condition is that the institutions must have a shared vision of the need for the development of a digital learning environment. If everyone wants something different, then getting such a complex service off the ground is like herding cats.
  • Secondly, publishers must be prepared to leave their paper business behind to participate in the transformation to digital.
  • Finally, institutions must play a more active role when it comes to creating a level and inclusive playing field in the classroom in regards to access to affordable textbooks. much like the US-invented Inclusive Access model.

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Apr 28th, 10:30 AM Apr 28th, 10:40 AM

Lightning Talk: eStudybooks: Affordable Digital Textbooks for Higher Education in the Netherlands

KIPJ Room EF

SURF, the collaborative organisation for IT in education and research in the Netherlands, is trying to set up a national service for digital textbooks in higher education. From 2017 onwards, several pilots have been executed in order to find out how such a service should function. Which model would work? An "All You Can Read" Spotify-like model? A “Read What You Need” Model? And what would the digital infrastructure look like for such a service? A national platform? Or is standardization sufficient, and can every university choose its own platform? Can universities continue to get away with shifting responsibility for the purchase of learning resources to the student?

The pilots made it clear that a number of conditions must be met for the desired service to succeed:

  • The most important condition is that the institutions must have a shared vision of the need for the development of a digital learning environment. If everyone wants something different, then getting such a complex service off the ground is like herding cats.
  • Secondly, publishers must be prepared to leave their paper business behind to participate in the transformation to digital.
  • Finally, institutions must play a more active role when it comes to creating a level and inclusive playing field in the classroom in regards to access to affordable textbooks. much like the US-invented Inclusive Access model.