Location

KIPJ Theatre

Session Type

45-minute concurrent session

Start Date

28-4-2020 11:20 AM

End Date

28-4-2020 12:05 PM

Keywords

Outreach, community service, local history, Fedora, Islandora, Digitization

Abstract

In 2003, the University of Manitoba, Manitoba Library Consortium, University of Winnipeg, Archives of Manitoba and Legislative Library of Manitoba partnered together to digitize significant resources related to the local history of Manitoba. As the University of Manitoba Libraries (UML) held unique expertise and resources important to the project, the University took the lead on many efforts required to complete the project. In the past sixteen years, UML has made 342,399 digital objects available through an online access platform: UM Digital Collections ( https://digitalcollections.lib.umanitoba.ca ). This included 37 newspapers with 24,368 issues and 200,439 pages, 573 books with 116,640 pages, and 342 images. This project helped to break down geographical barriers within the province and make unique resources available locally, nationally, and globally. This presentation will discuss how this project was initiated and implemented, as well as technical challenges and lessons learned. The project further demonstrates that an academic library can play a unique role in the preservation of local history and examines how UML continues to build, sustain and engage these communities over time.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 11:20 AM Apr 28th, 12:05 PM

Working with the Community to Preserve Histories

KIPJ Theatre

In 2003, the University of Manitoba, Manitoba Library Consortium, University of Winnipeg, Archives of Manitoba and Legislative Library of Manitoba partnered together to digitize significant resources related to the local history of Manitoba. As the University of Manitoba Libraries (UML) held unique expertise and resources important to the project, the University took the lead on many efforts required to complete the project. In the past sixteen years, UML has made 342,399 digital objects available through an online access platform: UM Digital Collections ( https://digitalcollections.lib.umanitoba.ca ). This included 37 newspapers with 24,368 issues and 200,439 pages, 573 books with 116,640 pages, and 342 images. This project helped to break down geographical barriers within the province and make unique resources available locally, nationally, and globally. This presentation will discuss how this project was initiated and implemented, as well as technical challenges and lessons learned. The project further demonstrates that an academic library can play a unique role in the preservation of local history and examines how UML continues to build, sustain and engage these communities over time.