Title

Opening Keynote: What is Open about Closed: an Ubuntu Perspective of Open Access

Presenter Information

Reggie Raju, University of Cape Town

Location

KIPJ Theatre

Session Type

Keynote Address

Start Date

28-4-2020 9:15 AM

End Date

28-4-2020 10:00 AM

Abstract

The principles of inclusivity and Ubuntu are the golden threads that are deemed to have been weaved into the open access fabric. If rolled-out as interpreted, it is viewed by global south countries as a solution to address inequalities and de-marginalisation of the marginalised. However, that open access cloud with the silver lining has evaporated with, inter alia, the introduction of deceptive proposals such as article processing charges and its different variations. The transformation of the open access movement has resulted in the closure of the old principles of inclusivity and the reintroduction of new processes, albeit well meaning, that reinstates the information divide and exacerbates current social and economic inequalities.

In this tottering open access climate, African open access movements must develop their own identity that advances social justice and that which is commensurate with its challenges. All closed channels of openness must be liberated: the continuum must include the de-northernization of the publishing landscape and grow more inclusive forums of dissemination.

Comments

Reggie Raju is the Deputy Director of Research and Learning Services at the University of Cape Town, South Africa.

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Apr 28th, 9:15 AM Apr 28th, 10:00 AM

Opening Keynote: What is Open about Closed: an Ubuntu Perspective of Open Access

KIPJ Theatre

The principles of inclusivity and Ubuntu are the golden threads that are deemed to have been weaved into the open access fabric. If rolled-out as interpreted, it is viewed by global south countries as a solution to address inequalities and de-marginalisation of the marginalised. However, that open access cloud with the silver lining has evaporated with, inter alia, the introduction of deceptive proposals such as article processing charges and its different variations. The transformation of the open access movement has resulted in the closure of the old principles of inclusivity and the reintroduction of new processes, albeit well meaning, that reinstates the information divide and exacerbates current social and economic inequalities.

In this tottering open access climate, African open access movements must develop their own identity that advances social justice and that which is commensurate with its challenges. All closed channels of openness must be liberated: the continuum must include the de-northernization of the publishing landscape and grow more inclusive forums of dissemination.