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San Diego International Law Journal

Authors

Cody Wisniewski

Library of Congress Authority File

http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79122466.html

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Any restriction on the importation of Egyptian artifacts into the United States between the United States and the Arab Republic of Egypt should not contain a restriction on the importation of Ancient Egyptian coins. Emergency restrictions on the importation of Ancient Egyptian coins would be inappropriate for three reasons. First, Ancient Egyptian coinage does not fit within the narrowly tailored requirements that the United States employs in order to impose import restrictions on particular artifacts. Second, the United States is the only country that is a signatory to the 1970 UNESCO Convention that is enacting such restrictions on ancient coinage, contrary to the policies of the 1970 UNESCO Convention. Third, Egypt should not be allowed the ability to control all coinage that was in any way connected to the ancient empires that resulted in the creation of Modern Egypt, since Modern Egypt is not the only country who can trace their lineage to Ancient Egypt. This Article will examine each of these in turn. Part II will discuss the current state of cultural patrimony law both internationally and domestically, as well as the current political situation in Egypt. Part III will set forth the problem with the potential impending restriction on the importation of Ancient Egyptian coinage into the United States. Part IV will argue that the Egyptian coinage sought to be restricted does not fit within the CPIA's guidelines for restriction. Part V will examine the current state of domestic import restrictions to determine if the United States is acting in a concerted international effort. Part VI will discuss some implications of broad importation restrictions on Ancient Egyptian coinage. Finally, Part VII will examine alternatives to broad importation restrictions on Ancient Egyptian Coinage.

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