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Comparison of Plantar Pressure of Different Prosthetic Feet in Able-Bodied Volunteers Simulating Active Foot Amputees during Locomotion

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Active foot amputees may choose from a variety of prosthetic foot designs to accommodate their financial and daily lifestyles, yet it is unclear what design is similar to non-amputee gait, specifically in pressure distribution. The hypothesis is that there are differences in plantar pressure distributions for different types of prosthetic feet during gait and pressure distributions are comparable to able-bodied gait. The purpose of this study is to inform active foot amputees of what prosthetic foot designs can help them complete their daily tasks similar to non-amputees through plantar pressure comparisons. The study will be conducted by using an orthopedic boot system that attaches to different prosthetic foot designs. The orthopedic boot (OB) will be used by able-bodied-non-amputee volunteers, so that their foot is immobilized from the knee down to simulate active foot amputees. The three prosthetic foot designs that will be tested are the articulated foot, tec limbs, and Niagara foot and will be attached to the left orthopedic foot. The S.A.C.H foot will be the control group attached to the right boot. The prosthetic feet are put into a shoe that has the Tekscan F-scan sensors in the insole. This Tekscan system has been used clinically and in research to evaluate dynamic pressure distribution in gait and running. To our knowledge, it has not been used to evaluate dynamic pressure distribution in amputee gait. Preliminary results demonstrate differences exist and further research is recommended with this system.

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Comparison of Plantar Pressure of Different Prosthetic Feet in Able-Bodied Volunteers Simulating Active Foot Amputees during Locomotion

Active foot amputees may choose from a variety of prosthetic foot designs to accommodate their financial and daily lifestyles, yet it is unclear what design is similar to non-amputee gait, specifically in pressure distribution. The hypothesis is that there are differences in plantar pressure distributions for different types of prosthetic feet during gait and pressure distributions are comparable to able-bodied gait. The purpose of this study is to inform active foot amputees of what prosthetic foot designs can help them complete their daily tasks similar to non-amputees through plantar pressure comparisons. The study will be conducted by using an orthopedic boot system that attaches to different prosthetic foot designs. The orthopedic boot (OB) will be used by able-bodied-non-amputee volunteers, so that their foot is immobilized from the knee down to simulate active foot amputees. The three prosthetic foot designs that will be tested are the articulated foot, tec limbs, and Niagara foot and will be attached to the left orthopedic foot. The S.A.C.H foot will be the control group attached to the right boot. The prosthetic feet are put into a shoe that has the Tekscan F-scan sensors in the insole. This Tekscan system has been used clinically and in research to evaluate dynamic pressure distribution in gait and running. To our knowledge, it has not been used to evaluate dynamic pressure distribution in amputee gait. Preliminary results demonstrate differences exist and further research is recommended with this system.