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Municipal Wastewater for Indirect Potable Reuse

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Collecting wastewater is vital for public health and water security in our increasingly water-scarce world. Municipal wastewater is classified as water collected from sewers and wastewater from homes and businesses. Before it is released into the environment, it is treated in a dedicated facility. Indirect potable reuse utilizes an environmental buffer such as lakes, rivers, or aquifers, to further filter the water. In this system, wastewater is collected, treated, and released - where it is filtered by natural systems until it eventually re-enters a treatment facility and is reclaimed and treated to meet drinking standards. Israel is the world leader in water reclamation and reuse, setting the example for the boundless possibilities through water treatment. Our team has the privilege of working with students and faculty at the Azrieli College of Engineering in Jerusalem to better understand the treatment and its implications to encourage the adoption of these technologies in countries such as the U.S., and especially in drought-prone regions such as California. As populations increase and the climate crisis becomes increasingly problematic, both developed and developing nations will feel the effects of water scarcity. It is crucial that we critically analyze the Israeli techniques of treating municipal wastewater for indirect potable reuse, and begin the implementation of these processes before it is too late.

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Municipal Wastewater for Indirect Potable Reuse

Collecting wastewater is vital for public health and water security in our increasingly water-scarce world. Municipal wastewater is classified as water collected from sewers and wastewater from homes and businesses. Before it is released into the environment, it is treated in a dedicated facility. Indirect potable reuse utilizes an environmental buffer such as lakes, rivers, or aquifers, to further filter the water. In this system, wastewater is collected, treated, and released - where it is filtered by natural systems until it eventually re-enters a treatment facility and is reclaimed and treated to meet drinking standards. Israel is the world leader in water reclamation and reuse, setting the example for the boundless possibilities through water treatment. Our team has the privilege of working with students and faculty at the Azrieli College of Engineering in Jerusalem to better understand the treatment and its implications to encourage the adoption of these technologies in countries such as the U.S., and especially in drought-prone regions such as California. As populations increase and the climate crisis becomes increasingly problematic, both developed and developing nations will feel the effects of water scarcity. It is crucial that we critically analyze the Israeli techniques of treating municipal wastewater for indirect potable reuse, and begin the implementation of these processes before it is too late.