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Soccer Fandom Impacting Hiring Decisions

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Although some past research suggests that hiring decisions are influenced by factors beyond work qualifications, a recent study found no evidence for biased hiring decisions. This study found that an American citizen, who was a fan of the Mexican soccer team rather than the U.S. National soccer team was no less likely to be hired for a CIA Analyst job (a U.S.National security position) or for a U.S. Agency for International Development Research (a non-National security position) [Jassim, O?Brien & Goldschmied 2019]. The current investigation set out to expand on this past experiment, by looking at whether the effect was present with a different sample as well as occupations. This study was conducted with Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) students who were thought to be more concerned with National security issues. Participants read about a candidate who was, again, either a fan of the Mexican or U.S. National soccer team. However, the candidate, this time around, applied for a border patrol agent stationed either on the Mexican or the Canadian border. The results did not support the prediction that an applicant, who was a fan of the Mexican National team, and applied to patrol the Mexican border, would be perceived as less qualified than a candidate who was a fan of the U.S. National team.

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Soccer Fandom Impacting Hiring Decisions

Although some past research suggests that hiring decisions are influenced by factors beyond work qualifications, a recent study found no evidence for biased hiring decisions. This study found that an American citizen, who was a fan of the Mexican soccer team rather than the U.S. National soccer team was no less likely to be hired for a CIA Analyst job (a U.S.National security position) or for a U.S. Agency for International Development Research (a non-National security position) [Jassim, O?Brien & Goldschmied 2019]. The current investigation set out to expand on this past experiment, by looking at whether the effect was present with a different sample as well as occupations. This study was conducted with Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) students who were thought to be more concerned with National security issues. Participants read about a candidate who was, again, either a fan of the Mexican or U.S. National soccer team. However, the candidate, this time around, applied for a border patrol agent stationed either on the Mexican or the Canadian border. The results did not support the prediction that an applicant, who was a fan of the Mexican National team, and applied to patrol the Mexican border, would be perceived as less qualified than a candidate who was a fan of the U.S. National team.