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Differences in Undergraduate Drinking Motives and Alcohol Involvement as Influenced by Gender and Neuroticism

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College marks the onset of drinking behaviors for many undergraduate students as they enter a new environment devoid of previous inhibiting variables. Whatever the reason college students choose to drink, and not all of them do, it is imperative that we understand the motives and influences that can lead to increased alcohol related risks in college. This study examines the relationship between drinking motives and alcohol involvement in undergraduate students as defined by gender, expanding on previous literature by not only analyzing the effects of a direct relationship between drinking motives and alcohol involvement but also analyzing the impact subject personality, namely neuroticism, may play in mediating and changing the relationship. Utilizing existing data and multiple regression analysis, this study evaluates the influence neuroticism has on alcohol involvement. Mediated path models for male and female subjects are used to test for gender differences in drinking outcome. I hypothesize that female undergraduates will have an increased likelihood of a mediated relationship between neuroticism and drinking outcomes because females are more likely to be neurotic than males. I also hypothesize that males will be less likely to report emotional reasons for drinking and as such will be unlikely to produce the mediated results. This study will provide insight into the gender differences in drinking motive and provide implications for changing the approaches we take to alcohol involvement by gender.

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Differences in Undergraduate Drinking Motives and Alcohol Involvement as Influenced by Gender and Neuroticism

College marks the onset of drinking behaviors for many undergraduate students as they enter a new environment devoid of previous inhibiting variables. Whatever the reason college students choose to drink, and not all of them do, it is imperative that we understand the motives and influences that can lead to increased alcohol related risks in college. This study examines the relationship between drinking motives and alcohol involvement in undergraduate students as defined by gender, expanding on previous literature by not only analyzing the effects of a direct relationship between drinking motives and alcohol involvement but also analyzing the impact subject personality, namely neuroticism, may play in mediating and changing the relationship. Utilizing existing data and multiple regression analysis, this study evaluates the influence neuroticism has on alcohol involvement. Mediated path models for male and female subjects are used to test for gender differences in drinking outcome. I hypothesize that female undergraduates will have an increased likelihood of a mediated relationship between neuroticism and drinking outcomes because females are more likely to be neurotic than males. I also hypothesize that males will be less likely to report emotional reasons for drinking and as such will be unlikely to produce the mediated results. This study will provide insight into the gender differences in drinking motive and provide implications for changing the approaches we take to alcohol involvement by gender.