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Model for Active Particle Swarming Analyzed

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For my research as a part of the physics program, I worked with Dr. Ryan McGorty on a solo project where we aimed to understand the way in which active particles may interact with each other and more specifically if and how those same particles could act as a swarm. We did this by using a system composed of Teflon disks which were made using a hole puncher in Teflon paper. These Teflon disks were then crafted to act as our model for active particles using camphor crystals on the water as the driving force. This system works as a model for active particles because the disks move on their own and are not being moved by an operator. From crafting these make-shift boats, we were able to analyze the structure and motion of the boats over time. We based our conclusions on a set of data, which had 100 boats in a petri dish and used a squirt bottle to introduce the water into the system, so the initial few minutes have been omitted from the data set. Using a modulated code based on ‘trackpy’, we found that the boats appeared to move together and swarm in different groups dependent upon the strength and tightness of groups of boats, however, more research is required to make a definite statement on whether or not active particles will swarm.

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Model for Active Particle Swarming Analyzed

For my research as a part of the physics program, I worked with Dr. Ryan McGorty on a solo project where we aimed to understand the way in which active particles may interact with each other and more specifically if and how those same particles could act as a swarm. We did this by using a system composed of Teflon disks which were made using a hole puncher in Teflon paper. These Teflon disks were then crafted to act as our model for active particles using camphor crystals on the water as the driving force. This system works as a model for active particles because the disks move on their own and are not being moved by an operator. From crafting these make-shift boats, we were able to analyze the structure and motion of the boats over time. We based our conclusions on a set of data, which had 100 boats in a petri dish and used a squirt bottle to introduce the water into the system, so the initial few minutes have been omitted from the data set. Using a modulated code based on ‘trackpy’, we found that the boats appeared to move together and swarm in different groups dependent upon the strength and tightness of groups of boats, however, more research is required to make a definite statement on whether or not active particles will swarm.