Session Type

40-minute concurrent session

Start Date

29-4-2024 3:15 PM

End Date

29-4-2024 3:55 PM

Keywords

controlled digital lending; accessibility; disability justice; diversity

Abstract

From Sagan Wallace:

Much has been said about the future of controlled digital lending (CDL) after the 2023 Hachette vs Internet Archive ruling. Some say CDL is on legally shaky ground, and others say CDL will continue to revolutionize how libraries provide materials. I believe these questions are a distraction from a significant issue in many CDL collections - inadequate accessibility.

My institution is a heavy user of CDL, with over 700 scanned textbooks. We formed a task force to identify the best methods to make our CDL collection more accessible. We found that creating screen reader accessible materials takes more labor and expense than expected. Because of this, we have significantly changed the way our institution processes scanned course reserves.

In this presentation, I will demonstrate the barriers people who use screen readers face when trying to access materials, and strategies we took to resolve these issues. I will explain the impact of upcoming legislation on our CDL collections. Finally, I will examine the difficult decisions librarians must make when choosing to make a few materials accessible to all, or many materials accessible to a few.

CDL isn’t going away, but our practices could open libraries up to risk from accessibility lawsuits. CDL textbooks exist because of accessibility failures in the publishing realm, where publishers refuse to license to libraries and instructors can’t find accessible course materials. But CDL is also a powerful tool we can use to make sure that all students can access all the materials they need for their education.

From Rice Majors:

In 2023, the University of California launched a landmark Mellon-funded research project to investigate the potential for expanded lawful use of digitized books with a goal of paving the way for national infrastructure. Project LEND has conducted a rigorous user needs assessment (looking beyond use cases supported by Controlled Digital Lending) to learn how scholars interact with digital books and corpora of digital texts, as well as a broad analysis of legal frameworks and technology stacks that could underpin one or more services. We will share a progress report of our findings so far, how the contours of the project have shifted as we learn from our users, and our plans for the remainder of the two-year grant period.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Included in

Accessibility Commons

Share

COinS
 
Apr 29th, 3:15 PM Apr 29th, 3:55 PM

Controlled Digital Lending is Dead; Long Live CDL / Progress report from Project LEND: UC's initiative to expand digital access for copyrighted material

From Sagan Wallace:

Much has been said about the future of controlled digital lending (CDL) after the 2023 Hachette vs Internet Archive ruling. Some say CDL is on legally shaky ground, and others say CDL will continue to revolutionize how libraries provide materials. I believe these questions are a distraction from a significant issue in many CDL collections - inadequate accessibility.

My institution is a heavy user of CDL, with over 700 scanned textbooks. We formed a task force to identify the best methods to make our CDL collection more accessible. We found that creating screen reader accessible materials takes more labor and expense than expected. Because of this, we have significantly changed the way our institution processes scanned course reserves.

In this presentation, I will demonstrate the barriers people who use screen readers face when trying to access materials, and strategies we took to resolve these issues. I will explain the impact of upcoming legislation on our CDL collections. Finally, I will examine the difficult decisions librarians must make when choosing to make a few materials accessible to all, or many materials accessible to a few.

CDL isn’t going away, but our practices could open libraries up to risk from accessibility lawsuits. CDL textbooks exist because of accessibility failures in the publishing realm, where publishers refuse to license to libraries and instructors can’t find accessible course materials. But CDL is also a powerful tool we can use to make sure that all students can access all the materials they need for their education.

From Rice Majors:

In 2023, the University of California launched a landmark Mellon-funded research project to investigate the potential for expanded lawful use of digitized books with a goal of paving the way for national infrastructure. Project LEND has conducted a rigorous user needs assessment (looking beyond use cases supported by Controlled Digital Lending) to learn how scholars interact with digital books and corpora of digital texts, as well as a broad analysis of legal frameworks and technology stacks that could underpin one or more services. We will share a progress report of our findings so far, how the contours of the project have shifted as we learn from our users, and our plans for the remainder of the two-year grant period.